Diagnostic Medical Sonography

DIAGNOSTIC MEDICAL SONOGRAPHY
By Virtue of an agreement between Union County College and Muhlenberg Snyder Schools, Plainfield, New Jersey, Union County College confers a degree of Associate in Science upon graduates of the Hospital-Sponsored school who have fulfilled the requirements for the degree specified by Union County College. 
Students in the program earn college credits in English, mathematics, biology, physics, social sciences and humanities electives in classes and laboratories conducted at Union County College. Diagnostic Medical Sonography courses are the primary responsibility of the program. Students must apply to Muhlenberg for admission to the Diagnostic Medical Sonography program by March 31 for the fall semester. Candidates must be high school graduates and must have had high school biology and algebra.
ADMISSION INTO THE PROGRAM IS COMPETITIVE.
 
The Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) with the recommendation of the Joint Review Committee on Education in Diagnostic Medical Sonography (JRC-DMS) accredits Muhlenberg Snyder Schools Diagnostic Medical Sonography Program (Program Number 110144).
Students are enrolled in the Schools of Diagnostic Medical Sonography and are matriculated by Union County College. They are eligible to participate in all student activates at Union County College and have the same rights and privileges as all other college students.
 
Students interested in the program should contact the Muhlenberg Snyder Schools at 908-668-2400 or 908-668-2844 for additional information.
Graduates of the Diagnostic Medical Sonography Program will be able to:
 
  • Obtain, review , and integrate pertinent patient history and supporting clinical data to facilitate optimum diagnostic results;
  • Perform appropriate procedures and record anatomic, pathologic, and/or physiologic data for interpretation by a physician;
  • Record, analyze, and process diagnostic data and other pertinent observations made during the procedure for presentation to the interpreting physician;
  • Exercise discretion and judgment in the performance of sonographic and/or other diagnostic services;
  • Demonstrate appropriate communication skills with patients and colleagues;
  • Act in a professional and ethical manner;
  • Provide patient education related to medical ultrasound and/or other diagnostic techniques, and promote principles of good health.

Search for courses in the online course catalog.

Sustainability Science

The Sustainability Science Option offers the first two years of a bachelor’s degree program with a major in Sustainability Science/Studies. It is designed for students who seek a career that focuses on the principles of sustainability as applied to a specific industry or business. A four-year graduate would be qualified for such current job titles as: Business Sustainability Officer or Manager, Sustainability Auditor, Energy Consultant, Design and Materials Consultant and Green Construction Manager.

Other course substitutions may be appropriate and students are encouraged to consult with a faculty advisor regarding appropriate course selections. Because of the diversity of undergraduate Sustainability Science programs, it may be necessary for students to take one or more second year courses at their transfer institution.

The stated sequence of courses for the Sustainability Science option assumes the completion of all prerequisites for the mathematics courses or satisfactory performance on the College Level Mathematics exam. Contact the Mathematics Department for further information.

Upon successful completion of all program requirements, graduates will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of ecological, geological and sustainability principles and their relations to problems involving environmental quality control and sustainability issues;
  • Employ computer software applications to represent and solve technical problems;
  • Perform laboratory procedures and assess the validity of experimental/diagnostic data;
  • Employ critical thinking and problem solving skills to solve technical problems;
  • Express and interpret both technical and non-technical concepts orally, in writing, and in electronic formats;
  • Demonstrate information literacy through familiarity and the effective use of related information resources.

Search for courses in the online course catalog.

Computer Science/Engineering

Option offered through the Professor Elmer Wolf Engineering Program
FOR COMPUTER ENGINEERING SEE “ENGINEERING”
The Computer Science Option offers the first two years of a computer science curriculum and prepares graduates for successful transfer to bachelor’s degree programs at leading engineering colleges throughout the country. Computer science, as an option in the Engineering program, studies theoretical and practical problems of system implementation involving both software and hardware. The program prepares the student for a career in the design and development of computer systems. Baccalaureate degree graduates understand hardware and software and can engineer computer systems for a variety of customer applications. 
 
Union County College has dual admission agreements with New Jersey Institute of Technology and Rutgers University. These allow Union County College graduates to transfer with junior status without going through a second admission process. Union County College also has formal transfer agreements with many other colleges.
 
Applicants for the Computer Science Option must present two years of algebra and one year of geometry, trigonometry, chemistry, and physics, as high school entrance credits. Students deficient in any of these subjects must take the appropriate preparatory courses. All candidates are required to take a mathematics and a physics placement test.
Upon successful completion of all program requirements, graduates will be able to:
 
  • Develop computer systems for solving specific problems
  • Design computer systems for specific applications
  • Analyze problems of a technical nature and design computer based solutions
  • Evaluate the merits of alternative proposals for solving problems
  • Interpret technical concepts to a non-technical audience
  • Manage a team project both as a leader and as a member
  • Express and interpret both technical and non-technical concepts orally, in writing and in electronic formats

Engineering

Professor Elmer Wolf Engineering Program

The Engineering program offers the first two years of a bachelor’s degree program in Engineering, continuing on in the bachelors degree programs of the leading engineering colleges throughout the country. The first two years are common to most fields of engineering (e.g., civil, electrical, and mechanical), but in the second year some students may begin to specialize in a field of their choice (e.g., chemical engineering). 

Union County College has dual admissions and formal transfer agreements with New Jersey Institute of Technology, Rutgers University, and other colleges. Due to the diversity of engineering curricula in certain fields of specialization, it is sometimes necessary for graduates to take one or two additional courses before attaining junior status at the transferring college.
 
Applicants for the engineering program must present two years of algebra and one year of geometry, trigonometry, chemistry, and physics, as high school entrance credits. Students deficient in any of these subjects must take the appropriate preparatory courses. All engineering candidates are required to take a mathematics and a physics placement test; students who are not placed in MAT 171 will not take PHY 111 and will be limited to a maximum of 15 credit hours during the first semester.
 
Upon successful completion of all program requirements, graduates will be able to:
  • Employ critical thinking and problem-solving skills in in the solution of technical problems;
  • Employ computer software applications in the solving and presentation of technical problems;
  • Interpret and produce engineering drawings using computer-aided drafting (CAD) skills and principles of engineering graphics;
  • Analyze problems of a technical nature and design computer based solutions;
  • Interpret and perform laboratory procedures and measurements;
  • Analyze and assess the validity of experimental data;
  • Manage a team project both as a leader and as a member
  • Express and interpret both technical and non-technical concepts orally, in writing and in electronic formats

Search for courses in the online course catalog.

Liberal Studies

Exploring Science and the Arts
This program is for adults who have been away from secondary school at least four years. The A.S. degree is awarded upon satisfactory completion of no fewer than 64 credit hours of work selected from the various disciplines of the College. It allows adults great flexibility to select their own college courses according to their own interests within six broadly defined educational categories: communication; business and public policy; humanities; mathematics, science, and technology; social science; and electives. Six to twelve college credits are required in each of these areas. The program meets the State-mandated general education distribution requirements for the Associate in Science Degree.
 
Many college courses have prerequisites. These prerequisites must be met before taking more advanced courses.
 
Upon successful completion of all program requirements, graduates will be able to:
 
  • Communicate effectively orally, in writing, and in electronic form.
  • Use technology and library resources for independent learning and research.
  • Compare and contrast the history and culture of the West in relation to its development in America and the world.
  • Describe the business culture of America, our political system, its history, and the American role in the world community.
  • Analyze the economic forces shaping all human societies.
  • Compare and contrast art, drama, music, literature, and the other humanities within both the American and the world setting.
  • Analyze the ethical implications of institutional policies and individual practices.
  • Discuss the findings of the natural sciences and their applications to practical problem solving.
  • Utilize college-level algebra and statistics to solve problems in the sciences and practical life.
  • Utilize the knowledge of psychology and sociology to analyze the human personality and its impact on social behavior and the learning process.

Search for courses in the online course catalog.

Architecture

Option offered through Engineering Program

This program is designed to prepare students who plan for a career in architecture to transfer to a five- year baccalaureate program.

Upon successful competition of all program requirements, graduates will be able to:

  • Employ critical thinking skills in science, mathematics, and fundamentals of architecture.
  • Demonstrate computer literacy in 3D programming and use of word processing, and other software applications.
  • Use technology and library resources to conduct research related to architecture, mathematics, engineering, sustainability, the humanities and social science.
  • Organize and present information to different audiences using various multimedia presentation techniques and platforms.
  • Compare materials and methods of building construction, analyze basic structural principles, collect and measure relevant data, and evaluate information as a member of a team.
  • Analyze a specific type of architectural building and compare and contrast different architectural design solutions.
  • Arrange and manage a collaborative design Charrette for/with local communities.
  • Demonstrate the ability to pursue lifelong learning by working independently in class and on research projects to prepare a portfolio.

Search for courses in the online course catalog.